Tag Archives: brooklyn

Class Spotlight: Bezel Setting!

Join us this weekend for a great foundation class in stone setting!

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This Saturday and Sunday, Dec 12 + 13,  11am-5:30pm Register Now!

The bezel setting is the earliest method for setting gemstones into jewelry – and hasn’t changed much over the last few thousands years. To create a bezel, you take a piece of metal and fabricate it to the size and shape of the outside of the stone. You then place the stone inside the bezel and push the metal over the top the stone.

Bezels are a simple, clean and secure approach to setting gemstones. They keep your gem safe and clean from dirt and don’t catch clothing.

 

Class Spotlight – Hinged Bracelets

We have an awesome six week class coming up on Thursday, November 5th for intermediate students: Silver II: Hinged Bracelets, with instructor Brice Garrett.

In this class you’ll learn how to fabricate a cuff, bangle or link bracelet in metal, with opportunities to learn new texturization techniques and brush up on your soldering skills. Excitingly, you’ll also learn how to create movement with your pieces using hinges, and you’ll learn how to create box clasps to ensure proper security and closure within your designs.

We’ve collected some antique jewelry inspiration below to get your design eye going:

Antique Victorian Bracelet featuring cool geometric inspiration.

Antique Victorian Bracelet featuring cool geometric inspiration.

Antique oxidize bangle with chain lock closure.

Antique oxidized bangle with chain lock closure.

Ancient Etruscan Bangle with pin hinge.

Ancient Etruscan Bangle with pin hinge.

Vintage cuff with stunning loop-work.

Vintage hinged cuff with stunning loop-work.

Not only will you learn valuable techniques for bracelet/cuff making, but you can apply your new hinge making skills towards other projects as well.

that opens! Work by instructor Brice Garrett

Make a keepsake box that opens using hinges. via Instructor Brice Garrett

Apply your hinge making skills to make a locket! via Instructor Brice Garrett

Apply your hinge making skills to make a locket. via Instructor Brice Garrett

So join us in the studio and sign up here!

Class Spotlight: Business For Designers + Jewelry Production Workshops

 

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So you’ve taken a few jewelry making classes, have a fabulous idea for a jewelry collection and have began making samples, but wait! Have you thought about marketing? How about how to set up a business in New York? How to apply for a sales tax certificate, and when to collect it?

Running a Jewelry Business is more than designing and making jewelry.  In fact, there are many more aspects to business that most designers aren’t aware of when they try to launch a new jewelry line. But don’t fret – we’ve got two classes coming up covering these topics among other valuable practical knowledge for starting and running a successful jewelry business.

Business for Designers (October 18 | Sunday | $120 | 11am-5:30pm) is all about learning how to start a jewelry business. You’ll learn about different types of businesses from sole proprietorship to a corporation, different laws and taxes you’ll need to know, as well as building a web presence and marketing your work.

Jewelry Production (October 17 | $120 | Saturday | 11am-5:30pm) is all about developing a coherent line for production, production techniques, selling retail vs. wholesale, and much more. You’ll also have an opportunity to bring in a few samples, and to discuss individual questions in a one-on-one setting with the instructor.

Take them together, and you’ll set yourself up for a successful business launch!

 

 

Student Spotlight: Aster + Antics

We met Juliana a couple of years ago when she started taking lessons with us. We’ve seen her work progress to the point of the launch of her jewelry line, Aster & Antics, and we couldn’t be more proud! Learn more about Juliana and her work below.

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-When did you first start making jewelry? 

I’ve been experimenting with beads, braiding, and knotting techniques for as long as I can remember. Growing up near the water, I would also make a lot of wire wrapped seaglass into pendants and earrings for myself and as gifts, but it wasn’t until a few years ago that I got into metalwork.

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-What class(es) have you taken at Liloveve?

I’ve taken Intro to Silver, Wax Carving I, Flush Setting, Bezel Setting, and a few one day workshops.

-Where do you draw your inspiration when designing your work? 

Much of my inspiration comes from the natural beauty of the earth and sea. I like taking an element that occurs naturally and re-imagining it into a design that’s new and unique, but that still maintains an obvious nod to nature. I’m also inspired by memories and past experiences, taking something so personal and turning it into something that other people can create their own meanings for.

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-Where do you exhibit / sell your work? 

I just launched my website and first complete collection! www.asterandantics.com

-Have you been featured in any press? 

Not yet! 😉


-What’s your favorite piece you’ve ever made? 

Favorite is hard, but a piece that’s close to my heart is my Barnacle Cluster Ring, which was the first piece I ever made in wax. I got so many compliments on it from people that I decided to refine it a bit and turned it into an extended group of designs in my collection.

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-If you could travel anywhere, where would you go? 

I’ve always wanted to snorkel the Great Barrier Reef!

-If you could collaborate with another designer/artist, who would it be and why? 

I would love to collaborate with someone like the artist Aurel Schmidt- she makes kind of dark, super intricate work that gets you thinking and errs on the bizarre. Also, the late MC Escher- I think the fluid, interconnected, maze-like patterns of his work would translate beautifully to jewelry.

-What’s the most fun aspect of being a jewelry designer? 

Definitely being able to take the jumble of thoughts and ideas in my head and turn them into tangible, wearable pieces of art.

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-Where can we see your work?

asterandantics.com

@asterandanticsjewelry

facebook.com/asterandantics

#benchtiptuesday – How to Carve Small Ring Sizes in Wax

A common question we get in the studio is how to size a wax ring for very small sizes. Most ring blanks come in a size 5 – so that pinky ring you’ve always wanted to make will require just a few more steps than your average ring.

How to Carve Small Ring Sizes in Wax

Suggested tools

Suggested tools

1. Starting with a solid wax tube in the color of your preference, cut out a ring blank to your desired width and evenly file the sides.

1. Starting with a solid wax tube in the color of your preference, cut out a ring blank to your desired width and evenly file the sides.

2. Measure the width of your ring blank.

2. Measure the width of your ring blank.

3. Figure out the middle point by dividing the diameter by two and marking that point with a scribe.

3. Figure out the middle point by dividing the width, or diameter, by two and marking that point with a scribe.

4. Make a bulls eye

4. Make a bulls eye

5. Using a drill bit and your flex shaft, drill a hole where the lines intersect (don't forget your safety glasses when operating your hand drill or flex shaft!).

5. Using a drill bit and your flex shaft, drill a hole where the lines intersect (don’t forget your safety glasses when operating your hand drill or flex shaft!).

After drilling.

After drilling.

6. Widen the hole using a wax bur.

6. Widen the hole using a wax bur.

I like to do this holding the flex shaft perpendicular to the wax blank. Always hold onto your piece while drilling.

I like to do this holding the flex shaft perpendicular to the wax blank. Always hold onto your piece while drilling.

7. Continue to widen the hole more with the same wax bur, or a cylinder bur.

7. Continue to widen the hole more with the same wax bur, or a cylinder bur.

I like to make small and gentle circles on the inside of the hole with the bur to slowly widen it.

I like to make small and gentle circles on the inside of the hole with the bur to slowly open it up.

8. Using a ring mandrel, continuously check your work while opening up the size. Make sure to push the piece gently down the mandrel to ensure accurate sizing.

8. Using a ring mandrel, continuously check your work while opening up the inside. Make sure to push the piece gently down the mandrel to ensure accurate sizing.

Et Voila! A size 2 ring for a pinky ring or otherwise teeny tiny hands! Learn more wax carving techniques in our in 6 week wax class listed here.

 

Student Spotlight: Angie Colombo

When did you first start making jewelry?

I started making jewelry about 20 years ago.

What classes have you taken at Liloveve?

Intermediate Silversmithing, Tube Setting, Flush Setting, Rose Cut Diamond.

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Where do you draw your inspiration when designing your work?

I draw inspiration from nature and from architecture. I also draw inspiration from people that I make connections with.

Where do you exhibit / sell your work?

Market NYC, Columbus Circle Holiday Market, Hester Street, Atlantic Antic, Crafts in Chelsea, Museum School Fair.

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Have you been featured in any press?

Not yet, but I will be in a blog for the Y Life coming soon.

What’s your favorite piece you’ve ever made?

My favorite piece that I’ve ever made was a pair of cuff links.  I unfortunately don’t have a photo of them. They were 14mm blue topaz, cushion cut stones set in a sterling silver bezel.

If you could travel anywhere, where would you go?

I would like to go to Italy, any part.

If you could collaborate with another designer/artist, who would it be and why?

 Michelle Chang, beautifully simple with lots of animal references.

I’m also interested in collaborating with PatrickIrlaJewelry and Arrok Jewelry.

What’s the most fun aspect of being a jewelry designer?

I get to create things.

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Where can we see your work?

You can find me on Etsy.

Student Spotlight: Amy Madden

When did you first start making jewelry?

As a teenager, I was obsessed with making jewelry. I went to art school with the intention of majoring in jewelry/metals, but ended up focusing on painting and printmaking instead. About 6 years ago, the jewelry bug bit me again.

What classes have you taken at Liloveve?

I’ve taken silversmithing, wax carving, tube setting, flush setting, rose cut diamond, business for designers and I’m currently taking a gold alloying class.

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Where do you draw your inspiration when designing your work?

Although I’m drawn to textiles and other intricate patterns, I tend to keep my jewelry designs very simple. From time to time, I will add a decorative motif or two, although I have a stack of sketches of more baroque pieces I’d like to try out.

Where do you exhibit / sell your work?

I have a website  and I used to participate in a lot of local markets and craft fairs. However, most people find me through my Etsy shop these days.

What’s your favorite piece you’ve ever made?

This ring was one of my first experiments in wax carving. I love the sculptural qualities of wax and feel that there are so many possibilities to explore in this medium, if only given the time!

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If you could travel anywhere, where would you go?

India—it has a reputation for being a total sensory overload, with both positive and negative aspects. I love the art, the bright colors, and the fragrant spices. Of course, I’m also fantasizing about finding sparkling piles of rubies and sapphires.

If you could collaborate with another designer/artist, who would it be and why?

I think I’d learn a lot collaborating with Alexander Calder, and I imagine he would be very playful. While he’s well known for his whimsical mobiles, I once came across a book about his jewelry creations. It can be a real challenge to get jewelry to hang right, especially if you want to incorporate asymmetry.

What’s the most fun aspect of being a jewelry designer?

Working with my hands is a true pleasure. This is a good thing, as jewelry making often requires a lot more time fabricating than designing.

Where can we see your work?

My website and etsy page.

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Tips for Marketing your Jewelry

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We all love to make pretty things, but how to we get the world to see them? Here are our tips for getting your work out there:

“Social Media is free and is a great way show your brand to the world! Facebook Page, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr / Blog – all of these are free, fun and easy and you can do everything from your smartphone. Show your fans behind-the-scenes shots of how your work is created, where your inspiration comes from, and the finished product! Don’t forget to tell them where to purchase.”

“stay in touch with your clients by using free platforms such as Mailchimp or Constant Contact – these services allow you to send email updates to your various networks.”

-Emilie, Program Director 

“A super easy way to get your designs out into the world is to loan some jewelry to your friends. Make sure you give them business cards to pass out as well. It also helps to go to stores and see what other jewelry is out there, or whats trendy at the moment. For example, I was talking to a local clothing store owner and she said people are really into ear cuffs right now, so I’m experimenting with different types of ear jewelry.”

-Kate, Program Assistant

“Know your audience and how to appeal to them.”

-Jillian, Director of Communications

If you’re interested in more tips, I came across an article on Launch Grow Joy, a blog dedicated to entrepreneurs, that lists more than 50 tips from jewelry designers all over the country. Below are some tips that grabbed my attention, as well as a link to the full article.

“Every person you meet is a potential customer. Wear a piece of your jewelry every day, every where you go.  Be friendly, positive and smile to everyone you see. When people compliment you on your jewelry, say thank you, hand them your business card, and say, since you like these earrings or this ring, bracelet, necklace or whatever it may be, please visit my website to look at my other jewelry. The person will happily take your business card and you now have a new potential customer.”  – Diane Batoff from Micassileo Jewelry

“Participate fully in shows and events. By this I mean taking the time to set up a professional booth with a consistent look. And, put down your cell phone…people want to shop with an artist who is present in the moment.” – Sherry Trammel-Schauls from Balsamroot Ranch Jewelry

“Create a look, word or color that is distinctively yours. When people see your work and marketing material, your name should pop in their head.” – Lauren Sigman from Lauren Sigman Jewelry

“When you post on Facebook or Pinterest, it needs to be VISUAL and done CONSISTENTLY.  I take some time at the beginning of the week to gather some photos, quotes, product shots, and get them ready to go for use that week. I also find material to share from other sources that fit with my brand (blogs, products I like, photos that inspire, quotes).  Then each day I get up before my kids and schedule the Facebook posts.  I often do several days at a time, but it’s important to stay engaged and make sure you’re responding to posts.  Of course you can hire someone to do this for you, but I enjoy connecting to my customers in such a personal medium as Facebook.  This doesn’t mean you have to be online constantly.  Just schedule your posts in bulk and it’s really pretty easy.” – Sarah Jane Nelson from Life is Rosey: Jewelry that Speaks

Have any tips of your own? Share them with us in the comments section!

Student Spotlight: Susan Alexandra

When did you first start making jewelry?

I started making jewelry when I was like…9. But my first proper metal working class was in 2012. And as Drake says, nothing was the same…

What class did you take at Liloveve?

I took the wax carving class with Emilie!

Baby Hold on Ring | ring created in Wax Carving I class

Baby Hold on Ring | ring created in Wax Carving I class

Fortune Teller Necklace | pendant created in Wax Carving I class

Fortune Teller Necklace | pendant created in Wax Carving I class

Where do you draw your inspiration when designing your work?

My inspiration is a mix of things that have shaped my aesthetic. Paintings by Frida Kahlo and Jan Bruegel, floral print scarves from Oilily, the gardens of Marie Antoinette and Instragram. I am also very influenced by my current emotional and mental state. A lot of my jewelry is meant to be saviors in the midst of chaos. 

Where do you exhibit / sell your work?

I sell through my site www.susanalexandra.com, retailers in the United States and Japan.

Have you been featured in any press?

Elle.com, March 2014

Elle.com, March 2014

Nylon Magazine, April 2014

Nylon Magazine, April 2014

What’s your favorite piece you’ve ever made?

Eye See Bracelet

Eye See Bracelet

Eye See Bracelet

Eye See Bracelet

If you could travel anywhere, where would you go?

Paris in the 1920’s, England in Medieval times where I was a princess in a castle, current times to Columbus, Oh to eat tuna noodle casserole made by my mama.

If you could collaborate with another designer/artist, who would it be and why?

Rihanna or Frida Kahlo. Or my brilliant best friend and artist Matthew Sabato of Measuring the Marigold.

What’s the most fun aspect of being a jewelry designer?

Working for myself! Creating what is purely my thoughts and feelings. Creating in general!

Where can we see your work?

OR my instragram, susan_alexandra

Check out Susan’s work on her website or follow her in instagram.