Class Spotlight – Hinged Bracelets

We have an awesome six week class coming up on Thursday, November 5th for intermediate students: Silver II: Hinged Bracelets, with instructor Brice Garrett.

In this class you’ll learn how to fabricate a cuff, bangle or link bracelet in metal, with opportunities to learn new texturization techniques and brush up on your soldering skills. Excitingly, you’ll also learn how to create movement with your pieces using hinges, and you’ll learn how to create box clasps to ensure proper security and closure within your designs.

We’ve collected some antique jewelry inspiration below to get your design eye going:

Antique Victorian Bracelet featuring cool geometric inspiration.

Antique Victorian Bracelet featuring cool geometric inspiration.

Antique oxidize bangle with chain lock closure.

Antique oxidized bangle with chain lock closure.

Ancient Etruscan Bangle with pin hinge.

Ancient Etruscan Bangle with pin hinge.

Vintage cuff with stunning loop-work.

Vintage hinged cuff with stunning loop-work.

Not only will you learn valuable techniques for bracelet/cuff making, but you can apply your new hinge making skills towards other projects as well.

that opens! Work by instructor Brice Garrett

Make a keepsake box that opens using hinges. via Instructor Brice Garrett

Apply your hinge making skills to make a locket! via Instructor Brice Garrett

Apply your hinge making skills to make a locket. via Instructor Brice Garrett

So join us in the studio and sign up here!

Class Spotlight: Business For Designers + Jewelry Production Workshops

 

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So you’ve taken a few jewelry making classes, have a fabulous idea for a jewelry collection and have began making samples, but wait! Have you thought about marketing? How about how to set up a business in New York? How to apply for a sales tax certificate, and when to collect it?

Running a Jewelry Business is more than designing and making jewelry.  In fact, there are many more aspects to business that most designers aren’t aware of when they try to launch a new jewelry line. But don’t fret – we’ve got two classes coming up covering these topics among other valuable practical knowledge for starting and running a successful jewelry business.

Business for Designers (October 18 | Sunday | $120 | 11am-5:30pm) is all about learning how to start a jewelry business. You’ll learn about different types of businesses from sole proprietorship to a corporation, different laws and taxes you’ll need to know, as well as building a web presence and marketing your work.

Jewelry Production (October 17 | $120 | Saturday | 11am-5:30pm) is all about developing a coherent line for production, production techniques, selling retail vs. wholesale, and much more. You’ll also have an opportunity to bring in a few samples, and to discuss individual questions in a one-on-one setting with the instructor.

Take them together, and you’ll set yourself up for a successful business launch!

 

 

Student Spotlight: Aster + Antics

We met Juliana a couple of years ago when she started taking lessons with us. We’ve seen her work progress to the point of the launch of her jewelry line, Aster & Antics, and we couldn’t be more proud! Learn more about Juliana and her work below.

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-When did you first start making jewelry? 

I’ve been experimenting with beads, braiding, and knotting techniques for as long as I can remember. Growing up near the water, I would also make a lot of wire wrapped seaglass into pendants and earrings for myself and as gifts, but it wasn’t until a few years ago that I got into metalwork.

AsterandAntics_SHOT10_1184_LAYERS

-What class(es) have you taken at Liloveve?

I’ve taken Intro to Silver, Wax Carving I, Flush Setting, Bezel Setting, and a few one day workshops.

-Where do you draw your inspiration when designing your work? 

Much of my inspiration comes from the natural beauty of the earth and sea. I like taking an element that occurs naturally and re-imagining it into a design that’s new and unique, but that still maintains an obvious nod to nature. I’m also inspired by memories and past experiences, taking something so personal and turning it into something that other people can create their own meanings for.

AsterandAntics_08_15_20150111_LAYERS

-Where do you exhibit / sell your work? 

I just launched my website and first complete collection! www.asterandantics.com

-Have you been featured in any press? 

Not yet! 😉


-What’s your favorite piece you’ve ever made? 

Favorite is hard, but a piece that’s close to my heart is my Barnacle Cluster Ring, which was the first piece I ever made in wax. I got so many compliments on it from people that I decided to refine it a bit and turned it into an extended group of designs in my collection.

Barnacle-Cluster-ring-whiteAsterandAntics_08_15_20150128_LAYERS

-If you could travel anywhere, where would you go? 

I’ve always wanted to snorkel the Great Barrier Reef!

-If you could collaborate with another designer/artist, who would it be and why? 

I would love to collaborate with someone like the artist Aurel Schmidt- she makes kind of dark, super intricate work that gets you thinking and errs on the bizarre. Also, the late MC Escher- I think the fluid, interconnected, maze-like patterns of his work would translate beautifully to jewelry.

-What’s the most fun aspect of being a jewelry designer? 

Definitely being able to take the jumble of thoughts and ideas in my head and turn them into tangible, wearable pieces of art.

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-Where can we see your work?

asterandantics.com

@asterandanticsjewelry

facebook.com/asterandantics

#benchtiptuesday – How to Carve Small Ring Sizes in Wax

A common question we get in the studio is how to size a wax ring for very small sizes. Most ring blanks come in a size 5 – so that pinky ring you’ve always wanted to make will require just a few more steps than your average ring.

How to Carve Small Ring Sizes in Wax

Suggested tools

Suggested tools

1. Starting with a solid wax tube in the color of your preference, cut out a ring blank to your desired width and evenly file the sides.

1. Starting with a solid wax tube in the color of your preference, cut out a ring blank to your desired width and evenly file the sides.

2. Measure the width of your ring blank.

2. Measure the width of your ring blank.

3. Figure out the middle point by dividing the diameter by two and marking that point with a scribe.

3. Figure out the middle point by dividing the width, or diameter, by two and marking that point with a scribe.

4. Make a bulls eye

4. Make a bulls eye

5. Using a drill bit and your flex shaft, drill a hole where the lines intersect (don't forget your safety glasses when operating your hand drill or flex shaft!).

5. Using a drill bit and your flex shaft, drill a hole where the lines intersect (don’t forget your safety glasses when operating your hand drill or flex shaft!).

After drilling.

After drilling.

6. Widen the hole using a wax bur.

6. Widen the hole using a wax bur.

I like to do this holding the flex shaft perpendicular to the wax blank. Always hold onto your piece while drilling.

I like to do this holding the flex shaft perpendicular to the wax blank. Always hold onto your piece while drilling.

7. Continue to widen the hole more with the same wax bur, or a cylinder bur.

7. Continue to widen the hole more with the same wax bur, or a cylinder bur.

I like to make small and gentle circles on the inside of the hole with the bur to slowly widen it.

I like to make small and gentle circles on the inside of the hole with the bur to slowly open it up.

8. Using a ring mandrel, continuously check your work while opening up the size. Make sure to push the piece gently down the mandrel to ensure accurate sizing.

8. Using a ring mandrel, continuously check your work while opening up the inside. Make sure to push the piece gently down the mandrel to ensure accurate sizing.

Et Voila! A size 2 ring for a pinky ring or otherwise teeny tiny hands! Learn more wax carving techniques in our in 6 week wax class listed here.

 

Student Spotlight: Elena Carey of Folkloric Jewelry

When did you first start making jewelry?

Jewelry making has been a hobby of mine since I was a little girl. I have a library of beads I have been collecting since childhood.

Designer, Elena Carey

Designer, Elena Carey

What class(es) have you taken at Liloveve?

Over the spring I took the Intro to Wax Carving class and can’t wait to take more!

Stunning wax carved pendant by Elena

Stunning wax carved pendant by Elena

Where do you draw your inspiration when designing your work?

Much of my inspiration comes from ancient Roman, Ghanaian and Viking jewelry. Sort of a weird mix. I really like pieces that use natural materials and carry strong symbolic meanings.

Krobo+beads+mega_1

Via Folkloric Jewelry

Where do you exhibit / sell your work?

I sell primarily at craft shows in NYC and the Hudson Valley.

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Via Folkloric Jewelry

Have you been featured in any press?

On AMNY.com

What’s your favorite piece you’ve ever made?

dame+somebody+2

Via Folkloric Jewelry

I call this piece “Dame Somebody.” I designed it while I was pregnant, and it references the story of a midwife who once delivered the baby of a fairy queen and the shenanigans that ensued. I love the raw yet refined qualities of these beads; Ethiopian brass and the beautiful turquoise stones. The turquoise is hand knotted on silk. This is one of my favorite techniques as I find it to be very meditative to do. I really enjoy designing pieces that have a combination of metal, stone and organic materials like silk or leather.

If you could travel anywhere, where would you go?

I’d love to spend time on the little islands that surround Ireland. I bet there are some beautiful pagan ruins and tales of faery folk only the locals know about.

If you could collaborate with another designer/artist, who would it be and why?

I love the dark, mysterious and whimsical work of Arthur Rackham. If only our timing were better! It would be exciting to create pieces of jewelry for all of the characters in his illustrations.

What’s the most fun aspect of being a jewelry designer?

Being able to make my creativity a commodity is an exciting challenge. I love going to markets and seeing my customers return to me, wearing pieces I’ve made. It is also so wonderful to receive letters from customers who wear my jewelry for special occasions, making me feel like my jewelry is now part of their own story.

Via Folkloric Jewelry

Stunning handmade clasps via Folkloric Jewelry

Where can we see your work?

www.shopfolkloric.com

@folkloricjewelry

Via Folkloric Jewelry

Via Folkloric Jewelry

Technique Spotlight: Granulation

Granulation is the exquisite and richly historic art of covering precious sheet metal in spherules or granules to create beautifully intricate textured metal jewelry. The technique is thought to have its origins in Sumer about 5,000 years ago. In the first millennium B.C. the technique was used by Etruscans living in present-day Italy. Greek craftsmen also employed the technique, but it was the work coming from Etruria which became famous, in part due to the mysteries surrounding the process.  It has baffled scholars as to how the relatively primitive Etruscan’s could create such intricate and delicate pieces without any real solder. Some concluded that they fused the very high karat metal sheet and the free standing granuals with some kind of organic glue, such as fish paste, and high heat. In any case, it was quite a feat, and a technique we replicate with modern practices to create this beautiful jewelry.

Ancient Etruscan Granulation EarringsEtruscan Granulation Pendant

This weekend Liloveve has the pleasure of hosting Jill Hurant as an instructor of our Granulation Workshop.  Jill is a phenomenal jewelry designer who uses the granulation technique in her line.  She employs incredible use of 22k gold paired with old world techniques like granulation, chain maile, & hand crocheting chains. Jill shows how this classical aesthetic can be applied to modern jewelry to create very unique and attractive pieces.

 Jill will be here this Saturday + Sunday sharing here granulation expertise at the Granulation Workshop Click on the link for more information and to sign up!

Take a look at her beautiful creations!

22k gold crochet bracelet with sapphires, granulated clasp with rose cut sapphires

Jill Hurant bracelet

#BENCHTIPTUESDAY!

 

At our class this Saturday July 11th JEWELRY PHOTOGRAPHY WITH YOUR PHONE, we will be teaching many pro tips to save you lots of money and resources while displaying your pieces at their best. Today, the one taster tip we will give is to always have the grid feature on when taking jewelry shots. This feature will help you center and frame your picture properly- symmetry leads to aesthetically better photos. See picture below. Click here to sign up for this one day intensive (this Saturday) taught by professional photographer Nicholas Papadakis and learn many more skillful pro tips to help in this very important part of marketing your jewelry.

guide-photo-grid1Grass_layout_2012_R2_LR (1) Nick Papadakis

Rings! Lots of Rings! Silver II: Stackable Rings, July 16- August 20

Adorn your fingers with many styles of metal and stone rings!

This is a class for all- entry level and more experienced bench jewelers. The course will begin with ring making from scratch.  This includes sawing, annealing and soldering sterling silver. So it kicks off with a great start for beginners, and a good refresher for those who have practiced these skills previously.  It will also teach many different bezel stone setting techniques- for cabochons, unusual shapes, faceted stones, fancy bezels with gallery wire or scallops etc.  Different decorative styles will also be shown such as hammered effect, wrapped wire, high polish and oxidized finishes. Students can make bold statement rings, or lots of delicate stackable rings- or both! It is a great class for learning lots of silvers smithing techniques, and coming away with some great pieces.

018 copyblack onyx roseely silver rings

Professional Jewelry Shots- With Your Phone!

Once you have created your beautiful pieces, a key element of selling and sharing it, are the photographs you capture them with.  It is undeniable that we live in a digital age, and most PR and sales are not down through direct display of your piece, but through an image of it.  So given this fact, we need to make sure the images we take of our work, are high quality, and representative of our brand.  Using a professional photographer is of course always a way to achieve this, however it can be very costly. Even charging just $15 a photo- which sounds like a small number- can really add up, i.e. 3 photos a piece, 10 pieces will bring you to a total of $450.  This class will teach you to take professional jewelry photos with any camera- iphones and other devices- so you won’t even have to invest in an expensive model.  $179 is a small cost in comparison to the potential expense of photography. We have artist and photographer, Nicholas Papadakis teaching techniques in composition and lighting, while working with small and reflective objects. He will teach you how to technically and creatively display your pieces, to showcase them digitally at their best, so you can go forward using your own new skills for in house for photography, without having the extra cost of outsourcing it. Below photo is take by the instructor with his phone!

iphone6_hands_resetGrass_layout_2012_R2_LR (1) Nick Papadakis

Hold Your Fire! Cold Connections: Making Jewelry without a Torch

This upcoming weekend we’re having one amazing workshop!  C-O-L-D  C-O-N-N-E-C-T-I-O-N-S!!!  Register Now!!

The coolest thing about this workshop is the lack of heat!  haha, just kidding, no more bad puns!

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In jewelry making, there’s a lot of ways to attach your metals together.  Cold connections are great alternatives to soldering, especially if you want to combine mixed media such as wood, ceramics, plastics, paper, fibers and more.  A lot of found objects and thinner metals cannot be heated, so if you’re interested in incorporating objects such as these, cold connections are the way to go.   There are so many cool techniques including: rivets, tabs, staples, settings, stitching AND students will learn other jewelry techniques such as sawing, forming, carving and finishing. This class is perfect for beginners to metal and jewelers who want to expand their skills and material repertoire.  Check out our Pinterest Board for some really cool inspiration!

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more students work:

 

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